Transcript of ‘Labour Students in conversation with Jeremy Corbyn’ event, Mountford Hall, Liverpool Guild of Students, Thursday 5th November 2015.

 

Izzy Hocking: I’m Izzy, I am Chair of the Labour Students society and it gives me great pleasure to introduce Steve Rotherham, who is the MP for Liverpool Walton.

 

[applause]

 

Steve Rotherham: Well, I’m talking to an audience, who probably aren’t old enough to remember a band called The Jam, some of you will hopefully. [cheering from audience] And in 1978, I watched The Jam from somewhere over there, about half way down, and it was a life-changing epiphany for me and I became a ‘mod’ on that day [laughter from audience] and I’ve been a ‘mod’ ever since, I’ll die a ‘mod’ and hopefully today you’re going to see something that will have a life-changing effect on you. And I think about twenty weeks, I followed Jeremy and the other leadership candidates around the country. And it was obvious to us that something was happening in politics, something that I’ve never seen before. And it was this, I suppose, momentum of people being enthused for the first time, in politics, and generally being interested in what Jeremy had to say. And when the overwhelming mandate from the members was announced on, I think it was the 11th, was it, or the 12th of September, and Jeremy bacame the leader, one thing that he did straight away was to build a shadow cabinet that had broader *feel*, so it wasn’t just politicians from one wind, if you like, or one aspect of the political spectrum. And he asked me to be what, disparagingly, I used to call a bag carrier. Now I think it’s a very important role, of course [laughter from the audience]…to the leader of the opposition. And so, one of the first duties for myself was to try and get Jeremy to come and visit Liverpool. And he’s been round our city and I know that you’re all students and some people won’t be from our city, many of you will become honourary scousers [laughter from the audience].But, Jeremy has seen Liverpool for himself, he’s been here many many times, of course, on his leadership campaign he was here. But he’s seen the vibrancy of our city and he’s won over by it. I wanted to do that and to bring him to, hopefully, the new generation of people, who will be interested and enthused in politics – that’s yourselves, by the way [laughter from the audience]. Because, I think, what he’s trying to do, the momentum, as I say, that he’s built, the interest that we get from people right the way across the country, is really important to the future of the party that I love, the Labour Party. And so, without further ado…I introduce the leader of the Labour Party, Jeremy Corbyn.

[applause]

 

Izzy Hocking: Bit of a change of plan. First of all, Margaret Greenwood, who is the MP for Wirral West, is going to speak to you first.

 

[applause]

 

Margaret Greenwood: Thank you very much and, just to follow quickly on from Steve, you know, it’s great to be here in the Mountford Hall. I think the last time I was here was seeing a band – I think it was Jonathan Richman and the Modern Lovers on this stage, it was fantastic, shows how old I am, but… No, seriously, it’s wonderful to see so many students here. What you’re experiencing now is an extreme right wing Tory government, which why it is just so important we rebuild the Labour movement as a mass movement, which is why it’s so good to see such a volume of people here. Gonna do a little plug for a campaign event I’ve got on Saturday. If anybody could come over and help, it’s in West Kirby on the corner of Banks Road, Dean Lane, at 10 am. Follow me on Twitter, where I’ve just tweed the details of where that is. But, seriously, very important bills around this movement. I decided to stand as a candidate because of what the Tories have done to the National Health Service; they’ve laid in place a legislation that has, in fact, privatised it. If we don’t get a Labour government next time, we will say ‘goodbye’ to our National Health Service. There may be some juniour doctors in the room; I’ve had conversations with many of them over these dreadful contracts that the government’s trying to put through. The government can hit the…juniour doctors, the rest of the NHS staff won’t be far behind. We’re fighting for every single thing we believe in, in this country, as a civilised way of life. The cuts to local authority services are huge, this afternoon we will be speaking with…the leaders of the fire and police services here on Merseyside… So, in Jeremy we’ve got an absolutely fantastic leader, who knows how to ignite an audience, so, without further ado, I’ll hand you over to the leader of the Labour Party [applause from the audience] Jeremy Corbyn.

 

[applause and cheering from the audience]

 

Jeremy Corbyn: Thank you. Thank you very much. Thanks for all coming here this afternoon, thanks for inviting me and giving me such a great welcome here. We had a number of events during the leadership campaign, in the area, in Birkenhead and in Liverpool. The greatest was that Saturday night at the Adelphi, was anybody there? [some cheers] Yeh! I can’t see anybody actually, waving over there…the lights are very bright. And that was one of the great campaign events that we had, where there were fifteen hundred people packed into a room made for eight hundred, so it’s just as the well the fire service didn’t come at that time [laughs from the audience]…and what it shows to me was, what Steve was talkng about, this…thirst for politics and thirst for ideas. Of course after the general election, I was…very depressed, very angry that we’d lost the election, very angry about what I could see coming down the line. But what I also felt was that…politics has to offer an alternative and it has to be a real alternative to the whole depressing narrative, that we’re gonna continue with years and years, of austerity to pay for a banking crisis, that was not created by students, street cleaners, hospital workers, doctors, fire fighters, factory workers, call centre workers, or any of the people that are now being hit by the austerity this government is imposing on them. We had to have a political alternative that challenged that whole story and that whole record. And the whole summer of campaigning around a country was absolutely fascinating. The numbers of people that turned out, young and old, all communities, all faiths, wanting to take part in serious, open, democratic politics. People that were prepared to say what they believe, people that were prepared to dream, and people that were prepared to recognise the history that we all come from; of those that fought for the right of votes, those that fought for women to have the right to vote [some cheers, followed by some laughs], those that fought for equalities legislation, human rights legislation and all those things, AND those that wanted a world of peace, not a world of war. There are an awful lot of people all over the country, who sometimes feel slightly shy of saying what their opinions are because they feel the dead weight oppression of the conventional media saying ‘that’s extreme, that’s extreme, you can’t say that, you can’t say that’ [applause from the audience]…NO…say it…

 

[applause and cheering from the audience]

 

Now Margaret was making a very, very important point. Yes, she was asking to come out on Saturday to join her in campaigning. Yeh, she was doing that. Campaigning for a purpose. It’s to get people to register to vote. And you might say ‘ok, well that’s an obvious thing to do’ – no it’s not, it’s a very important thing to do. As I said before, our democracy, our right to vote, came from very brave people, who laid down their lives in the nineteenth century, at a time of the utmost oppression; the Chartists, who marched on Parliament to demand universal suffrage, to demand accountable parliaments, to demand accountable government. And I’m very proud to say that the MP who presented the great charter in the 1850s to Parliament, was a man called Charles Duncan, who came from my area and indeed there’s a road named after him and a school named after him in my constituency, so we all walk in the footsteps of those that did great things before us. Well if we don’t excercise our right to vote, if we don’t demand a fair and equitable political system, then we all lose out. The reason voter registration, NOW, is very important, is this – there are elections coming up next year, all over the country, in various forms, particularly in Scotland, Wales, Bristol and London, where there are very, very key elections. Well there’s local authority elections all over, next year, and police and crime commissioner elections all over, next year, but there’s another factor to it. As you know, Parliament consists of two houses; a House of Lords and a House of Commons. I think if we too it in a straw poll of this floor, we’d probably come to the view that the House of Lords is…how should I put it jently, less important than the House of Commons…maybe…come to the view that there should be, as I certainly think, an executive second chamber, not an appointed one a hereditary second chamber.

 

[applause from the audience]

 

David Cameron’s idea of government is slightly different. So, he’s expanded the House of Lords to the second largest legislative assembly in the world; it’s now got over nine hundred members, and he’s threatening to put a couple of hundred more in there, in order to make sure he doesn’t lose any more votes there. At the same time, reduced the size of the House of Commons to six hundred members from six hundred fifty seven. That means every single constituency boundary has to be changed. It also means, that the basis on which the calculations for the new boundaries will be made, will be the numbers of people, who registered to vote on December the 1st, 2015, i.e. twenty five days away. Those numbers matter, because the constituency boundaries are going to be drawn of the basis of the number of people registered then, IRRESPECTIVE of the number, who register later on. To put if quite bluntly, if you live in a poor, inner city part of Britain, if you live in an area where many of the population are living in private rented accommodation, with only six month tenancies, and you don’t bother to register, if you’re a young person who doesn’t bother to register, then you won’t count. you might not get a vote unless you register later, but, above all, you won’t count in the way the boundries are drawn. So, come 2020, unless we get this thing right, Labour will start from a massive disadvantage, because of the under-representation in constituencies of the inner city, working-class, poorer communities, who are more likely to vote for what…and elect a Labour government in 2020. So, when Margaret asks you if you’re good enough to come out on Saturday, joining her in campaigning, it matters. But when you’re going to register people to vote, don’t just say ‘please fill in this form and register to vote’, say what you’re voting for, say the kind of society you want to live in and what it’s all about. This government is attacking the very core of our society. I’ll give you a couple of examples. The National Health Service, which Margaret referred to. How did we get a National Health Service? How did we…how… It’s somebody in Parliament one day sitting in the tea room, very nice tea room it is too, very nice, ‘oh yes, National Health Service, that’s a really good idea, yes, over the weekend healthcare, yes, oh yes, good…’ [laughs from the audience]. It was brilliant, brave, inspirational people, who saw the poverty and the short lives of those that were under-paid, under-nourished, under-cared-for, who couldn’t afford to go to the doctor, couldn’t afford to go to the hospital and to wait for a charity to care for them. So they took the view that healthcare shouldn’t be a commodity, to be bought and sold, it should be a human right, free at the point of use for everybody. It was a post-war Labour government, going through a period of most terrible austerity, and a former minor,…Ernest…Bevan, who got us the National Health Service, free at the point of use, as a human right and it’s a very, very important humal right. And it’s under threat. It’s under threat by the Health and Social Care Act, which requires 49% of its services to be given by the private sector, it’s under threat by a givernment that’s deliberately encouraging private…expense of the NHS and underfunding so much of it. And so, we defend our NHS, we demand a better NHS, that does care for all, including those with mental health conditions, and give real parity of care to those with mental health conditions. And I’m very proud that in the shadow cabinet, we appointed, after my election, I appointed Luciana Berger as the first cabinet…shadow minister ever, anywhere, to say, her responsibility is mental health.

 

[cheering and applause from the audience]

 

Mental health can effect all of us and so we campaign to remove the stigma attached to mental health; it can be a problem for any of us, at any time. And, particularly students, often go through periods of immense stress and sometimes find it very difficult to talk to fellow students or anyone else about it. So we remove the stigma – that changes things and that helps. So that is why I am absolutely, passionately committed to the principle of a health service, universal and free at the point of use – the point of first call for all of us, equally, to be cared for. Other countries don’t get it, United States…still doesn’t have it, we’re going to defend it against all covers and expand it because I believe so passionately in that. And there are, of course, inequalities. You could take a bus ride across any city of this country and the life expectancy could be…85 or 90 in the wealthiest subburbs. It would be…10 years less in the poorer inner urban areas. You go across Glasgow you get the same story, go across this city, you get the same story. Look at the difference in London between the borough of Kensington, the royal borough of Kensington and Chelsea, and Tottenham; not that far away, as a crow might fly, but an age and a world away in the lifestyle of those people. The NHS can’t solve all those problems, but it can recognise those, and therefore we need a system that gives people decent wages and decent opportunities. But this government is coming after people now, this question of tax credits. It was us, the Labour government, that introduced tax credits, as a way for people in work to be able to be able to survive, be able to have a reasonable income, be able to supports dependants, family and all the things that people need. The government has tried to reduce working-class credits by an average of £1300 for every recipient, for three million people across the country. We opposed it, all the way, in the House of Commons, and this was put to me, the question ‘should we ask Labour members of the House of Lords to oppose it?’. Somebody said to me ‘well, that’s not really your scene, because you’re against the existance of the House of Lords, you want a democratic upper chamber’. I said ‘of course I’m against the existance of the House of Lords, of course I want a democratic upper chamber’. BUT, WE, I, have a responsibility to do everything we can to defend people in receipt of working tax credits and defeat this government and we did defeat the government on it. So, they’ve been put back in their box and they’ve now got to come up with some alternative or, maybe, come up with no alternative and keep the system that we’ve got. I’ve asked this question of David Cameron six times last week, three times this week [laughs from the audience] and he’ll get the same question time and time again.

 

[cheering and applause from the audience]

 

People need to know what’s going to happen, but they also need to know that the Labour Party, in opposition, is…yes, of course we’re in opposition in parliament, of course we’re a minority in parliament. BUT we represent an awful lot of people. An awful lot of people are working with us, an awful lot of people are very worried about what’s happening to their life all around the country. Therefore, we are going to continue opposing this all the way AND, of course, the Welfare Reform Bill for the misery it’s putting on some of the most desperate people in this country, who are finding it hard to survive and hard to make end meet. So we will oppose those things all the way. But in opposing them, we have, also, to put forward some idea of the kind of world that we want to live in, I am fed up of the idea that, some way or other, we tolerate the levels of inequality we have in our society. As a society we walk by, on the other side of people sleeping on the street, people going through a crisis, people who are homeless, people who are destitute. It’s not right, it’s not neccessary, we should be strong enough, proud enough and capable enough to say ‘we want to live in a society that genuinely cares for all, in whatever crisis they’re going through, these things are possible’.

 

[applause from audience]

 

…to say ‘what is the function of government, in relation to the economy?’. Is it a book balancing excercise, as you might balance the books in the in the…your house? Or is it, actually, responsibility for everybody? Last week, last Thursday, I went to Scunthorpe. They’ve been making steel at Scunthorpe for a very long time. Originally, steel works came to Scunthorpe because there was coal nearby, because there was iron ore nearby, because there was limestone that could be got – the steel works developed. It’s now a huge steel works, making very, very high quality steel. People there have give their lives to that work, very skilled people; young people doing matallurgy…apprenticeships, wanting to contribute to that industry. And suddenly it’s all under threat. Why? Because we have a world trade system that seems to be inadequately policed and there’s cheap, low quality steel being dumped in this country. Therefore nobody’s going to buy that steel. With a government that says it can’t do anything about that, because it can’t possibly intervene and that’s a matter for the market. Well I’m sorry, it’s a matter for us as a society, for a government, to be sure that we do have a steel industry in Britain, that can make the steel that is needed, that is the basis of every possible aspect of a manufacturing economy. So, again, us in opposition raised a number of things. We demanded the government to be, we demanded the government support that industry, we demanded the government stand up to the coutry that’s dumping this steel in Britain, which is China at the present time. As a result of that, Angela Eagle, Hilary Benn and myself went to see the Chinese president to put that case to him. And indeed we met their trade minister to put exactly the same case to him. Again, us, in opposition, with popular support, public approval, going forward to make those demands. I don’t know what the outcome of all this is going to be, but I do know – doing nothing is not an option. Doing something is an option. Doing everything you can is the only option that’s available for us to try and protect ourselves.

 

[applause from the audience]

 

…I feel very passionately about democracy and about the rights of people and the rights of individuals. Our rights, our democracy didn’t come by a gift from the divine right of the power of kings and queens who happily gave it up century after century so we ended up as a relatively democratic society. No. Every single step of the way, they were fought for. The Peterloo Massacre in Manchester, the Chartists that I mentioned, the Tolpuddle Martyrs, so many others that stood up for the rights of people to join trade unions, stood up for the rights of people to vote, stood up for the rights of women to vote, stood up against racism, stood up against discrimination, stood up for the rights of lesbian, gay and transgender people not to be discriminated against, stood up for all those things. All those things were achieved by popular action and people with vision, who were prepared to go out and march and demonstrate. So I think we have a responsibility to speak up for human rights issues all around the world, which is why I…I was…people were slightly sceptical about why we did it, but in the speech that I was honoured to make to our party conference…at the end of September, I, quite deliberately, put, in the middle of that speech, the case of a young man, who was due to be crucified in Saudi Arabia and why I think it was wholly wrong for the British government applying to run the prison service, in Saudi Arabia, which would have carried out the crucifiction against this young man, who would…who’s only crime was to go on a demonstration. People all over the world got involved; social media, Twitter, Facebook and so on and mounted a campaign in his support. The result? British government withdrew from applying for that contract. That man has, so far, been spared any punishment of any sort. It’s difficult, often, to stand up for cases of human rights abuse, but you’ve got to do it. I pay huge tribute to those that have stood out on wet…wet Saturday mornings at high streets around the country, collecting signatures for the case of Shaker Aamer, who was in Guantanamo Bay, who’s never ever been charged with anything, all these years he’s been in Guantanamo Bay. And I went on a delegation to Washington, in May, to pleed with…with them to release him, let him come back to Britain, he’s a British resident. And, eventually, last weekend, Shaker Aamer came home…

 

[applause from the audience]

 

…standing up for people, standing up for their human rights and their justice. Ysterday, large numbers of students marched through London. I knew it was going to happen, because as I going into parliament yesterday mornin, the steel barriers were already up, I thought ‘ah, students are coming’ [laughs from the audience]. Helicopters were being revved up going ‘duhduhduh’ over here – students are coming [laughs from the audience]…and all that sort of thing. What was it all about? Well you know what it was about as well as I do. The final bit of public support, for young people who go to university, threatened to being removed. The maintenance grant, which is so important for those students that get it. I want to see university education available and accessible for all, as I’m sure you’re enjoying your time at university. I want to see opportunities for everyone to be able to study, learn their skills to the greatest of their potential. For the individual, yes, for the learning, yes, but also for good of all of us. If somebody becomes a good engineer – our trains and travel are safer, and somebody becomes a good doctor – our health is better. We all benefit from education. So I want to kind of rebalance the thing, so that we value learning and education for what it is and don’t always treat it soully as a commodity to be bought and sold. Let’s value LEARNING for what it is. And let’s not condemn the arts to endless cuts and closures and ending of regional and local theatres and support for arts courses in universities. A society needs engineers, it needs doctors, it needs lawyers, it needs accountants, but it also needs poets, historians, philosophers and writers. THAT is in the very DNA of all of us, that we all wish to have; that right to express, that right to enjoy things. So, why is it some children in school – parents can afford to give them music lessons and theatre lessons and drama lessons, others can’t do that. Sorry, ALL children must have that right, that right to go to school…

 

[cheering and applause from the audience]

 

Last night we had a huge rally in the cabinet sector in…in London, Camden Town Hall. And I’ve got a special affection for that place, because during the…leadership contest, we organised a rally at the cabinet sector and it got very much oversubscribed, so we had to have…four overflow meetings, including one that I addressed from the top of a fire tender…I won’t explain how [laughs from the audience]…outside. And there’s this wonderful picture of…a group of teenagers trying to climb IN through a window to get into a political meeting. Think about that; teenagers into a wall to go to a political meeting – something has changed. Because it wasn’t that young people, or isn’t that young people, are not interested in politics. It is that young people are being put off by a politics which is…a theatrical elite playing games with each other, rather than representing the real needs and aspirations of ordinary people.

 

[cheering and applause from the audience]

 

…about refugees. Now, you’ve all read what the papers say about migration, about refugees, about all the problems that go with them. I’m sure you’ve all seen all that stuff. I look at it this way; yesterday morning, there was a…very moving film for a couple of minutes, maybe three minutes, very early in the morning, on Al Jazeera. It was an interview with a gravedigger, in Lesbos, the island of Lesbos. Now he was describing his job, which was to dig graves; to dig graves to bury the refugees that drown and wash up on the shores of this island. He said ‘I don’t know who these people are, I don’t know their names, but what I know is – they’re human beings, who are trying to in a very difficult and very dangerous world. I feel it’s a terrible shame that they die on my shores and never get to a place of safety’. There’s lots of reasons why people are seeking asylum, there’s lots of reasons for it, the wars and all the other things. The problem is with wars – the victims go on and on, generation, generation, generation. And those desperate people are fleeing for a…place of safety. So we have to do two things; do our very best to get a political solution to the problems of the whole region, so we don’t have to live in danger of insecurity, don’t have to flee, but also, recognise that those people that are dying in the Mediterranean, living in the camps in Callais or anywhere else, are human beings, just like you, just like me, just like Steve, just like Margaret, who want to live and survive. Let’s not see all of them as a problem, let’s see them as fellow human beings, who we must reach out to, support and help, who…just as we would want it for ourselves if we were going through the same horriffic experience.

 

[cheering and applause from the audience]

 

Politics is an endlessly fascinating process and parliament is an endlessly fascinating place, but also a place that…must be more democratic and more representative of ordinary people. And so, what we try to do, is open up the political process. Open it up, find crowd sourcing, questions to the prime minister every Wednesday, I’m sure he looks forward to it enthusiastically [laughs from the audience]. I’m waiting for evidence that he’s hacking into my e-mail account to find out [laughs from the audience] what all these forty, fifty thousand e-mails a week are about that I’m getting from people that want to ask him questions. And it’s interesting, the questions are often very different from the questions that MPs of their own formation would ask. Because they will write, they will write questions about housing, about jobs, about hope, about enviroment, about sustainability. Very interesting, wonderful passages. And we try to crowdsource and ask those questions, as a way of opening up the process. But also what’s changed, in politics, is about our party, the Labour Party. We have recruited a very large number of members, we’re now up to…somewhere near 400,000 across the whole country – the largest membership ever in my lifetime and I joined the Labour Party when I was sixteen. I feel very strange seeing Bessie Braddock’s statue when I come into Lime Street station, I remember Bessie Braddock, I had a terrible argument with her actually, but nevermind [laughs from the audience]…mind you she had an argument with everybody, so well… [laughs from the audience] And…that huge membership of our party…have joined for a reason. Yes, I’m sure, they joined because they want us to win elections in the future, but it is also about how we do politics in the mean time, how we decide what our policies are. I want it to be a much more open process. I don’t want somebody, i.e. me or anybody else, deciding policy and passing it down the food chain. No…I don’t even want a food chain. All I want is an open democratic process, where everyone’s ideas, inspiration, knowledge and optimism can be shared with others. So come 2020…[applause from the audience]…to thrust thrust a book of policies on the electorate, saying ‘that’s the manifesto!’, and people say ‘oh yeh? What’s in it? Sorry I don’t know’…well you give it to them, somebody might read it, somebody might not – no. How about, we get to 2020, where we have a series of ideas, policies and aspirations that are actually that are actually the collective wisdom of avery large number of people. So that we have an economic policy that IS about investment, that is about growth, that is about equality, that is about fairness…in taxation, that is about creating jobs and opportunities for people, where the employment policy, which is positive rights at work, rather tham the anti-trade union legislation that the government is putting through at the present time. A housing policy that doesn’t accept that through the law the increase in the private rented sector will go on largely unregulated with many people fearful of what will happen to them after six months in their private rented sector flat. An environmental policy that recognises we cannot go on damaging our ecosystem, damaging our biodiversity without there being an effect on the living standards of the lifestyle of all of us. So it’s partly an inclusive, educative process. So I wanted to come in and put those ideas forward at a policy-making process that’s open, inclusive and democratic for all. Because, at the end of the day, what politics is about is deciding our society, what kind of world it would want to live. Is it the world of ‘I’ or is it the world of ‘we’? Is it the world wehre we, collectively, DO concour inequality, do concour poverty, and make our contribution to live in a world where we don’t feel the need to put barbed wire and razor wire round this continent and around North America to keep out the victims of wars, envoronmental degradation and inequality, that are trying to survive in a very difficult and complicated world. None of this is simple, none of this is easy, but if we want to live in that better world, and we want the next generation not to be poorer that this generation, but actually be better off because of the huge technical and technological advances that have been made, then we have to do it together. You can’t do it on your own, you can’t do it when your whole philosophy is individualism at the expense of the good of the collective. And, what’s so exciting about this time, is the way in which people are coming together; all faiths, all cultures, all nationalities, all backgrounds trying to achieve that collective world. There’s no future in xenophobia and discrimination against people. There’s every future in all of us coming together to achieve that decent and better world – that is what has been so exciting about this year so far. And that’s what’s so exciting about the opportunities that are ahead of us. Don’t be fooled when the media say ‘all these ideas are so 1970s, 1870s or any other seventies’, it’s always the seventies they’re talking about [laughs from the audience], the sixties was actually pretty good [laughs from the audience]. No, these are the ideas of the twenty-first century. These are the ideas that people have had enough of the elitism and the top-down politics, they want the democracy, the participation straight from solidarity of people coming together – that’s what’s so exciting about these times. That, I think, may be, one of the factors that’s brought us all together tonight at this fantastic meeting and all the other incredible gatherings that are going on in the present time. Dream high, work high, dream of that society, but WORK for it; where we do have that real equality of opporitunity, that real equality of justice and that real hope for a peaceful, sustainable world in the future. Thank you very much.

 

[cheering and applause from the audience]

 

Izzy Hocking: Before you all leave, I’ve just got four things to ask of you. I hope you’re all feeling as inspired right now as I am. Firstly, I really can’t stress enough, how easy it is to get involved, locally, in politics. Get in touch with your local councillors, get in touch with local MPs, like Margaret, and go and campaign for them. It’s so easy, everyone is so friendly and we can really make a difference. Secondly, please get involved in the Labour Students Society. At the moment our campaigns are working towards the student voting registration drive, as well as, we’re hoping to campaign to support local food banks. Thirdly, Liverpool Young Labour are going to the Casa bar, on Hope Street, and they would love everyone to join them. And, last, please please have another round of applause for our incredible speakers.

 

[cheering and applause from audience]

 

 

The Mountford Hall, before Mr. Corbyn's arrival

The Mountford Hall, before Mr. Corbyn’s arrival