This October, Liverpool welcomed the Royal de Luxe Giants to walk its streets for one last time. There was no year more fitting for the finale, as 2018 marks a decade since Liverpool was designated European capital of Culture. The city welcomed the 4-day extravaganza with open arms.

The popularity of the festivities was clear from Thursday night, the snaking queue of visitors desperate to capture a glimpse of the sleeping Little Boy Giant, taking refuge in his hammock hung in St George’s Hall. Music boomed through the square, spreading the atmosphere of excitement and anticipation, a fraction of what was ahead in the upcoming weekend.

© Culture Liverpool/Liverpool City Council/Ant Clausen/Mark McNulty/Pete Carr/Serge Koutchintsky

Stopping commuters in their tracks, Lime Street station was disturbed by an Arriva bus split in two with a knife, this brought a touch of our city into the Giants’ theatrics.

© Culture Liverpool/Liverpool City Council/Ant Clausen/Mark McNulty/Pete Carr/Serge Koutchintsky

Awake from his slumber the Little Boy Giant, joined by Xolo the dog, made his way to Princes Park as thousands of spectators led the way. Meanwhile, crowds in the Wirral gathered to find the Giant, without his diving suit, washed up on their shores of New Brighton beach. Luckily, the fire service was on hand to ensure he was hydrated after his long voyage.

The Little Boy Giant in Liverpool wasn’t to go without, rouge clad puppeteers made sure he and Xolo were well fed with cake; all before settling in his deck chair in Princes park. A discarded sandal across the grass hinted to the people, who was to come the following day.

© Culture Liverpool/Liverpool City Council/Ant Clausen/Mark McNulty/Pete Carr/Serge Koutchintsky

Millions gathered in Liverpool beneath ginormous clothes hung out to dry awaiting the arrival of The Giant. In through the Docks he floated on his raft, only to give his feet a well-deserved soak on arrival.

© Culture Liverpool/Liverpool City Council/Ant Clausen/Mark McNulty/Pete Carr/Serge Koutchintsky/Gareth Jones

He was soon joined by cheeky Xolo and The Little Boy Giant, who trundled the streets greeting those who had gathered to soak up a bit of the magic.

“Their movements are just so lifelike, I think that’s what makes them so surreal” – Spectator.

On Sunday, the gang were joined by a surprise guest and familiar face to those who had seen the Royal Luxe Giants before, the Little Girl Giant. They paraded around the city joined by their creator Jean Luc – who sported equally dream-like attire, radiating creative genius.

© Culture Liverpool/Liverpool City Council/Ant Clausen/Mark McNulty/Pete Carr/Serge Koutchintsky

Millions gathered, and the city held an intense feeling of togetherness, old and young dreaming together.

“Even if thunder wanted to crush the city, sewn clouds were protecting the sky.  The heart of the inhabitants radiates so strongly that we can hear the beats echoing over to Dublin”

– Liverpool Dream.

© Culture Liverpool/Liverpool City Council/Ant Clausen/Mark McNulty/Pete Carr/Serge Koutchintsky

The sun began to set, and the Little Boy Giant bid the final goodbye, sailing off in the Giant’s sandal- as if it were all a dream. It is sure to say that the theatrics have left a Giant-sized footprint on the heart of Liverpool.

All images are credited to: © Culture Liverpool/Liverpool City Council/Ant Clausen/Mark McNulty/Pete Carr/Serge Koutchintsky