Author: Cy Sutherland

2017 Guild Election Results Breakdown

This year a record 6424 votes were cast, a massive 31% on last year’s turnout. Over 26.88% of the student population voted, with only 18 spoiling their ballot. More women than men – 28% to 24% – voted. Out of all of the societies, 100% of the members of Free Education Liverpool and the Indonesian society turned out to vote. In contrast, only 8% of the Art Society voted. The three incumbents – Sean Turner (President), Oba Akinwale (SO), Ananda Mohan (SO) – were re-elected; and newcomer, Rory Hughes joined the team. In his manifesto, Sean Turner promised to...

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Newly-elected SO, Rory Hughes, addresses controversy surrounding Guild elections…

In light of the scandal about the gender representation at the recent Guild Student Officer elections, Rory Hughes, the new-comer, has this to say: There has been some (justified) anger and sadness at the results of the recent Guild Officer elections. As the only new person elected to that position I wanted to address some of issues that have been raised (or haven’t been) and lay out my position. These include incumbency, women’s representation and mental health. I promised to write regular blogs as a way of being held accountable as a Guild Officer so here is the first....

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What would ‘out’ actually mean?

After watching successive debates about the EU, each more mundane than the last, you will have heard the ‘leave’ side talk about life after Brexit, and the UK’s position ‘out’ of the EU; but what would ‘out’ really mean? There are a series of alternative relationships that the UK could forge with the EU, and I will explore the following: the Norwegian, the Swiss and the ‘clean break’ models. Each model offers potential benefits, negatives, and would potentially have huge implications on the UK economically. Norwegian Model It is irrefutable that leaving the EU would cause a significant economic...

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Have we forgotten about Osborne’s tax credits debacle?

The Conservative government suffered a rare defeat in the House of Lords over tax credit reform, which was also a personal setback for the Chancellor of the Exchequer, George Osborne. Osborne planned to remove tax credits; welfare benefits provided to low-income workers, based roughly on ‘earned income tax credits’. Introduced by the Clinton administration, tax credits were subsequently adopted by the former British Chancellor of the Exchequer, Gordon Brown. The Conservatives have two primary motives to reduce welfare spending: fiscal and ideological. Firstly, the government have specified that they need to make £12.5 billion of savings in welfare over this...

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